Blog

25
07/07/2017 11:42 AM Posted by: Vic Caso


TDT Plumbing is excited to announce that we are the first LeadSmart provider in Texas, as well as one of the ePIPE providers chosen to rollout the nationwide LeadSmart launch.

What is LeadSmart?

LeadSmart is the first program of its kind that will revolutionize the way homes and buildings test their water for lead and reduce the lead levels to safe levels. The initial roll out of the program is being done in Southern California, Houston, Florida and in the DC markets. We are proud to be a part of the first program to help eradicate lead contributors from the American water supply system inside and outside of buildings. This unique program is for residential homes and all types of commercial and government buildings, from schools to hospitals to office buildings.

 

The LeadSmart Process

Detect:  Our certified testers use U.S. EPA-approved equipment and methods to test water coming from the tap on-site. Lead or copper levels are read in minutes, so we can provide our customers with real-time data about their water. Then, based on the test results, we conduct a thorough review and analysis of the potable water supply piping system and fixtures on the property.

Recommendations & Remedy: Should lead levels exceed the EPA guidelines for lead (15 ppb), we identify lead contributors, which include lead solder (often used with copper pipes), galvanized steel pipes, bronze fittings, brass fittings, lead fittings, lead fixtures and lead flux.  The solution can range from simply replacing non-compliant lead fixtures, fittings, etc., to applying the patented ePIPE epoxy barrier coating process to the potable water piping system.

Certification: We provide a LeadSmart Certificate of Compliance when the home or building is tested in compliance to current EPA guidelines for lead (15 ppb or less).

Insured Protection For You: LeadSmart testing services are backed by an industry-first $1 Million Errors and Omissions Insurance program.

 

Our Special Promotion for Residential Customers:

We care about our community and our customer’s water quality.  That’s why we are offering a discount on lead testing and LeadSmart certification for our residential customers when they choose a whole-house ePIPE restoration. Normally a $400 value, we are offering this service for only $200 for a limited time! Contact us soon and mention this promotion to learn more.

 

Our Special Promotion for Commercial Customers:

For a limited time, we are offering FREE lead testing and LeadSmart certification to all commercial (non-residential) properties when they choose the ePIPE restoration process for that property. Take advantage of this limited-time offer by calling us as soon as possible and mentioning this promotion.

 

 

 

Please contact me, Vic Caso, to learn more about LeadSmart, our limited-time offers or how we can help solve your piping challenges!

Vic Caso                                                                 

Vcaso@tdtplumbing.com

713-697-2088

 


22
02/15/2017 11:08 AM Posted by: Vic Caso

Discolored water is a common plumbing problem that often scares people. But let me give you a reason to breathe a sigh of relief: Just because your tap water isn’t clear, doesn’t mean that it’s harmful. However, it does mean that something is wrong with the domestic water system.

(And remember, lead in your water supply IS harmful!)

It’s important for all adults to take notice of our tap water’s color, smell and taste, as well as other details of our water pipe systems, especially if you own your home.

So if not all discolored water is dangerous, what does the discolored water mean? And how can you tell if your water is dangerous for consumption? We break it down for you:

 

 

 

Yellow or Semi-Red Water – If your tap water is clear at first but then changes to yellow or rusty color when it stands, then there is ferrous iron in the water, which means the iron that is leaching into the water has not rusted or oxidized yet. This is not harmful to our health, but note that this type of iron cannot be filtered out of your water.

Rusty Reddish Water– This color water means that ferric iron (oxidized iron, also known as rust) is leaching into your tap water. While this is not toxic, it is not easily filtered out and can stain sinks, bathtubs, etc.

Greenish Blue Water (dangerous) – If you’re seeing this color water, find out if your water pipes are copper or if you water system has brass fittings. If so, this water discoloration is a result of copper leaching and the water is dangerous for consumption. Please contact a plumbing company, like us, immediately. 

Green Water (dangerous)– Seeing green water means algae buildup has occurred in your plumbing system. Please contact a plumbing service company, like us, to correct the issue.

Black Water (could be dangerous)– This could be from manganese, which is harmless, or it could be from mold or mildew. Therefore, it’s best for you to call a plumbing company, like us, to check it out.

Pink Water – Your local water authority may have accidently added too much potassium permanganate to the water supply if the water looks pink. However, it is not harmful to human’s health.

Purple Water (dangerous)- A harmful amount of potassium permanganate was probably added to the water supply to cause it to turn purple. It’s best for you to inform the water authority about it immediately.

White or Cloudy Water– This mean extra air is trapped in or moving through the water. If you put some of the cloudy tap water into a glass. Bubbles should rise and the cloudiness should dissipate.

Clear Water (could be dangerous)– Lead does not have a taste or smell and it cannot always be seen in drinking water. That clear, clean-looking water coming out of your tap water may have dangerous levels of lead in it and the only way to know for sure is to have your tap water tested.

 

More info about Rusty Water:

Iron can get into the water supply due to iron being in the soil or if the pipe system contains iron. Iron in plumbing systems deteriorates over time due to the chemistry from the water and oxygen. The natural by-product of corroding iron is rust, which breaks off in the pipes and goes to the tap, causing the water to be discolored and usually revealing a rusty color. Keep in mind that the EPA says iron in water is not toxic and does not have a direct impact on health.

 

 

So now what?

If you’re located in southeast Texas, please give us a call or send us an email with your concerns or questions. We’d love to help!

Sometimes discolored water problems have easy fixes and sometimes they don’t. The best way to alleviate or prevent discolored water (as well as pinhole leaks, under slab leaks, low water pressure, bring lead leaching into compliance and other problems) is to protect your galvanized or copper water system with a safe (tested and certified to NSF Standard 61), internal pipe epoxy barrier coating. The patented ePIPE epoxy barrier coating is a cost-effective and better value alternative to a whole house repipe. Learn more about ePIPE by clicking here.

 

DISCLAIMER: The information in this blog post is to be used as a reference or guide to learning more about water discoloration. It is not intended to be used for diagnosing plumbing problems or whether one should drink or not drink the water.  Water discoloration is a symptom of something wrong with the pipes or water supply. We advise anyone who has discolored water at their home or place of work to contact a local plumbing company or TDT Plumbing for assistance and more information.

 

Please feel free to contact me, Vic Caso, to learn more about how we can help!

Vic Caso

Vcaso@tdtplumbing.com

713-697-2088

 

 

 


20
12/16/2016 11:52 AM Posted by: Vic Caso

 

There is a special charm to older homes. The architecture, the story the house holds within its walls, beautiful original features, such as hardwood floors or a hand-carved staircase.

Old houses may be full of personality, but they’re also full of old plumbing. And it’s something to be mindful about.

If your house was built before the 1970s and still has the original plumbing – it’s just a matter of when your old plumbing will fail. (Also, since old plumbing is often made of galvanized pipes, usually the pipes won’t last this long, so there’s a good chance that at least part of the plumbing has already been replaced or rerouted.) Whether you have lived in your older home for decades or are considering purchasing an old house, it’s extremely important for you to be informed about old house plumbing problems so that you know what to symptoms to look for and how to handle them.

 

 


Old House Plumbing Problems:

Clogged galvanized pipes - If you’re experiencing rusty-looking water or low water pressure, these are common signs that your galvanized pipes have a lot of internal corrosion. Galvanized pipes are steel pipes covered with a layer of zinc, but the zinc slowly erodes. When corrosion and rust form inside the pipes, which naturally occurs with time, they block the flow of water to the tap, cause discoloration to the water and, even worse, leach toxic lead into the water.

Solution: We would most likely recommend a whole house ePIPE. ePIPE is a patented process that thoroughly cleans the pipe system and then applies a strong epoxy barrier coating inside the pipes to prevent the water from touching the pipes. This prevents corrosion, rust, lead leaching, leaks and other problems.

 

Clogged drains – It’s very common for older houses to have problems in the sewer line that runs from the house to the city main beneath the street. Over the years, this underground sewer line could have developed breaches or holes, which attracted nearby tree roots, causing root intrusion and blocking the line. More possibilities include the sewer line moving from the ground shifting or the line being crushed from roots growing on top of it, as well as the drain system getting plugged up from built-up grease, food or items that were not supposed to be discarded down the drain, such as a diaper. (There’s no telling what the previous owners flushed down those drains.)

Solution: Plumbing problems in old houses often include slow drains, but a camera inspection should be able to find the cause. If there is a small blockage that can be removed, it could be a quick and easy fix. But depending on the type of drain pipes, their layout and what lays above them, each individual case will have a unique solution. However, we highly recommend you get your drains hydro jetted around every two years to prevent blockages and slow drains.

 

Defective repairs made by previous homeowners or handymen – Over the years, your home probably had multiple owners. And maybe one of these homeowners decided to do a DIY fix-it project on the plumbing or maybe a homeowner had a handy cousin who made his own repairs. Some common problems could be pipes not connected properly, sink drains getting stopped up easily or a mistake could be more serious, such as a hot water heater being installed incorrectly.

Solution: Get the entire plumbing system looked at by a professional, like our team at TDT Plumbing. We understand the difference between efficient plumbing and troublesome plumbing, and can assess the system to predict if there will be future problems.

 

Leaks – Leaks are practically inevitable. All types of pipes can leak after so many years of use. Signs of domestic water, air conditioning or fire sprinkler pipes leaking include wet walls, wet floors, mold and increased water bills. Signs of a sewer pipe leaking are foul odors, wet spots on the floor or landscape and slow drains. As you can imagine, leaks are stressful, disruptive, destructive and expensive to deal with. The ideal situation is to invest in a long-term solution that will prevent the pipes from corroding on the inside and forming leaks.

Solution: Depending on the problem, fixes could range from a very small pipe replacement to a reroute or to a whole house pipe lining project to prevent the other pipes from failing (as an alternative to having all of the pipes ripped out of the house). A competent plumber will be able to analyze the situation and give you options depending on your budget and timeframe.

 

Old fixtures – Old fixtures in old plumbing can corrode with time and lose functionality, so they need to be replaced. Examples of fixtures include faucets, shower heads, angle stops, shut-off valves, supply lines to fixtures, and drain traps.

Solution: Hire an honest and trusted professional plumber, like TDT Plumbing, to examine your plumbing system’s fixtures and suggest which fixtures need to be replaced.

 

Lead service line – Houses and buildings constructed before the 1960s often have a lead service line running from the city’s water main beneath the road to your house. These lead service lines are notorious for leaching dangerous levels of lead into your tap water. You should err on the side of caution and have your water tested for lead (and other contaminants).

Solution: Lead service lines are dangerous to your family’s health. Instead of spending a small fortune to have your yard dug up, the service line pulled out and replaced, we highly recommend a whole house ePIPE. This is a patented process that thoroughly cleans the pipe system and then applies a strong epoxy barrier coating inside the pipes to prevent the water from touching the pipes, ultimately protecting your water from toxic levels of lead.

 

Weird or unsightly reroutes – You may notice signs of previous reroutes in your kitchen, laundry room or outside. Reroutes are often performed in place of a repipe, so that means that the pipe system was experiencing problems. 

Solution: If you don’t like the way a reroute looks or if you want to make sure the rest of the plumbing is working efficiently, and if you live in southeast Texas, please contact us. We can assess the reroute for a low fee and provide our professional advice about your options.

 

 

If you currently live or plan to live in an old house, make sure you’re educated about the home’s old plumbing. The types of pipes, where they’re located, how old they are, their diameters and the plumbing’s repair history are all important details to know.

We suggest you have the old plumbing inspected by a trusted plumbing team, such as TDT Plumbing, and have annual or biannual maintenance (such as cleaning the interior of the pipes) on all of the pipe systems within the house to ensure maximum efficiency and minimal probability of problems. We hope you utilize this advice or give us a call to prevent old house plumbing problems.

 

 

Please contact me, Vic Caso, to learn more about how we can help!

Vic Caso

Vcaso@tdtplumbing.com

713-697-2088


14
06/14/2016 11:11 AM Posted by: Vic Caso

A lot of families are worried about if there is lead in their homes’ drinking water. And the truth is that you should be worried about it.

According to The Associated Press and The Denton Record-Chronicle, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality has announced that hundreds of Texas public water suppliers did not test for lead or copper in their water systems last year

Unfortunately, this type of failure and incompetence at the municipal level means that families are mostly on their own to test their water for lead and copper and protect their families from lead contamination.

(If you don’t know too much about lead in water, including what causes it, as well as the effects of lead contamination, then please read our prior blog post about these subjects.)

 

Could Your Home Have Lead Contaminated Water?

If your home (or your place of work) was built before the mid 1980s, there is an increased likelihood that the water distribution system contains lead. If the house or building was constructed with galvanized or copper pipes, these pipes may have lead solder or other lead content that can contaminate the water.

There are two things you must do if you are worried about lead in your drinking water:

1) Get your water tested.

Important message from the CDC: "The only way to know whether your tap water contains lead is to have it tested. You cannot see, taste, or smell lead in drinking water. Therefore, you must ask your water provider whether your water has lead in it. For homes served by public water systems, data on lead in tap water may be available on the Internet from your local water authority. If your water provider does not post this information, you should call and find out.” 

2) Use a safe and time-proven interior pipe coating method to prevent your clean water from touching the metal pipes, which will thereby protect against lead leaching.

At TDT Plumbing, we utilize the globally trusted ePIPE® Lead-Free, Leak-Free™ pipe restoration process to create an epoxy coating inside of the water pipes. This pipe lining technology forms a barrier coating (absolutely certified safe for drinking water) that protects against lead and copper leaching, pinhole leaks, discolored water and pipe corrosion.

 

 

Why do we use this method?

  • Cost-effective and minimally invasive process compared with a pipe replacement
  • Much faster project turnaround time than a pipe replacement project
  • Prevents destructive, expensive and wasteful leaks
  • Protects against metal (lead and copper) leaching
  • Greatly extends the useful life of the pipe system
  • Improves water flow
  • Provides healthier, cleaner water to the tap
  • Our customers love the technology and its results

Learn more about this technology by clicking here to read about it and watch videos.

 

 Read a customer success study about the use of this technology in a San Antonio, TX, home.

 

Have questions? Concerned about your water pipes?

Please contact me, Vic Caso, to learn more about how we can help!

Vic Caso

Vcaso@tdtplumbing.com

713-697-2088

 

 

 

 

 

 


8
02/17/2016 05:00 AM Posted by: Vic Caso

We have all heard about Flint, MI, and the dire problems the residents have been facing. It has left the rest of the country sympathetic and concerned about their local water’s quality. The reality is that this fear, anger and criticism is well justified.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA),nearly 40 million Americans consume lead-contaminated water every day

 

What is lead-contaminated water and why is it bad?

Lead, at any dosage, is toxic to the body when ingested, inhaled or absorbed through the skin. It accumulates in the body and can cause lead poisoning. Lead has been known to cause learning disabilities, hypertension, headaches and behavioral problems when consumed by children. Lead consumed by adults can cause high blood pressure and disorientation, as well as damaging the nervous system, stomach, brain, kidneys and red blood cells. Some effects of lead poisoning are permanent.

Lead can make its way into a clean water system due to mining, smelting and similar operations. But homes built before the mid 1980s often were constructed with pipes, fixtures or solder that contain lead. Lead pipes, brass/bronze fixtures, copper pipes and galvanized pipes have been known to cause lead-leaching, due to lead in the metal or lead solder or fixtures commonly used with those types of pipes.

When clean drinking water passes through pipes, fixtures or solder that contain lead, the water can corrode the pipes, fixtures or solder, thereby releasing the lead that is then picked up (leached) by the water. Then this water goes to the tap and you consume it.

Some water is more corrosive than others, due to water acidity, high temperature, low dissolved solids and high amounts of dissolved oxygen or carbon dioxide. Corrosive water corrodes pipes, fixtures and solder faster than average, so lead leaching is definitely a concern where there is corrosive or aggressive water.

 

Why isn’t the government doing anything about it?

The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) is the United States’ law that says that every public water system in the country should ensure safe drinking water for the people. It was signed into law at the very end of 1974. In 1986, an amendment was added that requires regulation and filtration for contaminants and gives the public the right to know what exactly is in their water and how it is treated.

The most recent amendment, in 2011, is the Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act that tightened the definition of "lead-free” plumbing fixtures and fittings that are legally allowed in water distribution systems. This amendment went into effect in 2014.

Local governments are having infrastructure crises. The bridges, roads and pipes that were installed a century ago are falling apart, and Americans have noticed. While these are necessities to continue daily life for all citizens, local governments have been struggling to find the resources and strategies to fix or replace the aging and breaking infrastructure. Money, time, downtime, manpower and technologies are all resources that most local governments do not currently have. This has left the public feeling frustrated and disappointed, with good reason.

 

What can I do to prevent lead-leaching in my home or building?

If you own a house or work in a commercial building that was built before the mid 80s, there is a good chance that the water distribution system contains lead. If the home or building has galvanized or copper pipes, these pipes may have lead solder or other lead content that will contaminate the water. Lead is also commonly leached into drinking water through lead service pipes, because many U.S. cities still have lead service pipes that transport water.

We offer our customers the most innovative, beneficial solution that has been proven to stop lead leaching into clean water: the ePIPE epoxy coating technology.

The patented ePIPE pipe lining process uses blown-in technology to create a protective epoxy barrier coating inside water pipes. This coating prevents water from touching the lead pipes, fittings, flux or solder, thereby preventing lead leaching or leaching of any metals. Environmentally friendly, as well as family-friendly, this method is non-destructive, so there isn’t any tearing out walls, floors, ceilings or landscape. The disruption is very minimal, if at all, and relocation of residents or tenants is not needed. (The ePIPE technology also prevents or mitigates pinhole leaks, corrosion, discolored water and other common problems in water systems.)

Utilizing the ePIPE technology is the solution you are looking for if you want to protect your family from lead poisoning. Please contact me, Vic Caso, to learn more about how we can help!

 

 

Vic Caso
Vcaso@tdtplumbing.com
713-697-2088

 

 


6
10/27/2015 05:00 AM Posted by: Vic Caso

Although the percentage of lead content in plumbing systems has been greatly reduced since the mid 1980s, unfortunately it is estimated that tens of millions of American homes and buildings still have lead content in their plumbing systems. When water passes through these lead pipes, lead fittings, lead flux or lead solder, the lead is leached into the clean water, which is then transported to homes, schools, hospitals and senior facilities.

The truth is that the amount of lead that is safe for consumption is ZERO.

Lead in drinking water is especially poisonous for infants, children and pregnant women. Studies have shown that even low levels of exposure to lead can cause a significant reduction in a child’s IQ.

If you own a home that was built before 1986, there is a good chance that your home’s water plumbing contains lead. If your home has galvanized or copper pipes, these pipes may have lead solder or other lead content that will contaminate the water, slowly poisoning you and your family. Lead is also commonly leached into drinking water through lead service pipes. Plenty of major U.S. cities still have lead service pipes that transport water.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

"The only way to know whether your tap water contains lead is to have it tested. You cannot see, taste, or smell lead in drinking water. Therefore, you must ask your water provider whether your water has lead in it. For homes served by public water systems, data on lead in tap water may be available on the Internet from your local water authority. If your water provider does not post this information, you should call and find out."

You might read that the only solution for preventing lead leaching into your drinking water is a complete repipe of all of your home’s pipes. However, this solution is not ideal because it is incredibly expensive, destruction and disruptive to your family’s lives.

The experts at TDT Plumbing have a much better solution: the patented ePIPE technology.

The patented ePIPE pipe lining process uses blown-in technology to create a protective barrier coating inside water pipes. This coating prevents water to touch the lead pipes, fittings, flux or solder, thereby preventing lead leaching or leaching of any metals. Environmentally friendly, as well as family-friendly, this method is non-destructive, so there isn’t any tearing out walls, floors, ceilings or landscape. Disruption is very minimal, if at all, and relocation is not needed.

Utilizing the ePIPE technology is the solution you are looking for if you want to protect your family from lead poisoning. Please contact me, Vic Caso, to learn more about how we can help!

Vic Caso
Vcaso@tdtplumbing.com
713-697-2088


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